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Hawaii 'Return To Home' Program Will Pay To Fly Homeless People Back To The Mainland

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#1
Player #7

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Homeless people in Hawaii wishing to return to their families on the mainland will soon be able to turn to the state for financial help with the journey, when a hotly debated program launches later this year.

http://www.huffingto..._n_3653498.html

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#2
Jus

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I heard about this, and so far, I'm like...

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On one hand, the cost of living here is insane compared to most of the rest of the country, and recovering from hard times is much harder because of that. On the other, is the solution really GTFO? Is there a way to verify that they're going home to a support network? I've also heard (unverified) rumors that other states send their homeless here, which I don't want to believe. I really have no idea about homeless programs or how they help people, here or otherwise, so I'm not too sure how to feel.

That said, I need to respond to this comment because I've heard it elsewhere and it irks the crap out of me.

I can't imagine a better place to be homeless. What would happen if other states decided to send their homeless to Hawaii? Think about it Bloomberg.


LOLNO. First off, being homeless sucks ass anywhere. Actually, I'll just let someone from the /r/hawaii sticky explain it:

Note/Rant: When I worked in the retail/tourist industry, I used to hear this a lot from tourists: "It must be awesome to be homeless in Hawaii! :D" NO. IT'S NOT. IT'S FUCKING NOT. Do not delude yourself into thinking that if things go bad, it'll still be sunshine and coconuts for you. The homeless are always being shuffled back and forth because nobody wants them in our parks or beaches. It can get dangerous on the streets. It's not always sunny here. Sometimes it rains and when it rains hard with trade winds, you best believe the homeless aren't singing "Tiny Bubbles." If you really want to live here, save up and be smart about your money.


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#3
Risk

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LOLNO. First off, being homeless sucks ass anywhere. Actually, I'll just let someone from the /r/hawaii sticky explain it:


I'm not disagreeing with you. Being homeless sucks compared to our modern lifestyle.

But it can suck a whole lot less depending on where you are, what season it is, what kind of person you are, what supplies you have available, and what kind of practical skills you have. And perspective, especially perspective. I see being homeless in a large city as the lowest of the low. Homeless out in the country? It's... different.

There are men out here (this is Kentucky, by the way), who have gone full forest hermit and have lived that way for years. Some of them are local legends. I'll use Rick as an example. Rick is about 60 and looks like a typical mountain man; big guy, big beard, long hair. He's a vietnam vet who, for whatever reason, decided to abandon society, go to the middle of LBL state park, and live out the rest of his days. He's been out there since 1989. I met him because he sometimes made the 40 mile walk to Trade Day in town, to trade things that he'd made or found; arrowheads, hiking sticks, cane poles for fishing, folk art, etc. He said he usually only made the trip when he was out of salt or wanted some books, because everything else could be found. He has a two room log cabin, a woodburning stove he made out of car parts, and a small patch of land he cleared for growing vegetables and pot. No one bothers him, and I guess the park rangers, if they can even find him out there, leave him alone.

Another thing to note about Rick is that, speaking to him, he comes off as a completely sane, witty and well read dude.

I don't know the details of how he lives, but it's not hard to imagine. KY is a rainforest. You can't walk 10 feet without an edible plant slapping you in the face, or 20 feet without some tasty mammal scurrying away. Fresh water is everywhere.

Anyway, given the right knowledge in the right location, the definition of homeless gets a bit hazy.
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#4
BDNeon

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Well he's technically not homeless if he has a cabin. That would qualify as a home.

Still, loved reading your description, living out here in drab suburbia a person can become rather distanced from the wild rustic aspects of our country. Easy to forget there are still people who live in the old way.

I would however definitely categorize the "alone but self sufficient" folks like Rick seperately from those who are homeless and live in squalor.

#5
mikebuttersbee

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why cant the "mainland" do this to people >_>

lets ship all our homeless to alaska!

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#6
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Makes sense. Hawaii is super expensive, exposure would be quite bad compared to some other areas, and there isn't exactly too much room.

KY is a rainforest.

Uh... what? The only rainforest on the east coast is in the southern Appalachian Mountain region like Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. Granted it isn't all exactly continuous so there could be a small section or two in Kentucky since it is close to the region but I would never call the state a rainforest. The only state that has a major section of rainforest would be Washington and even then I wouldn't call it a rainforest.

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#7
Risk

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Makes sense. Hawaii is super expensive, exposure would be quite bad compared to some other areas, and there isn't exactly too much room.


Uh... what? The only rainforest on the east coast is in the southern Appalachian Mountain region like Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. Granted it isn't all exactly continuous so there could be a small section or two in Kentucky since it is close to the region but I would never call the state a rainforest. The only state that has a major section of rainforest would be Washington and even then I wouldn't call it a rainforest.


This is true, my regions lies in what they classify as humid subtropic. I call it a rainforest because, I mean, it feels like a goddamn rainforest. Do you know what it's like to drown in the air?! It happens here every day. True story. I could probably take photos and convince quite a few people they were taken in the Amazon or somesuch.

We've got some rainforest luxuries too, (large insects, a variety of poisonous snakes, spiders, amphibians and plants, flash floods, angry marsupials, fish that can take fingers), but the worst thing is how the environment lets bacteria and parasites like giardia thrive almost year round. Cuts can become septic overnight.

#8
AbnerDoon

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Meh, They have been doing this for a while and it happens over here on the mainland too. I work around the San Ramon and Blackhawk area the cops pick them up and drop them in Dublin by bart all the time. They usually don't even make it through me grabbing something to eat on my lunch break. I can see someone panhandling and by the time I have ordered a sandwich and headed back the cops are grabbing them or have already done so.





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